Jerry Jones CPA
Wouldn’t it be nice to have a CPA that you deal directly with, that understands your business, that works in all 50 states and is there for you when you need him?
“Working with Jerry has literally taken a load off my back. He explains what you can and cannot do with clarity and makes “year end” a painless concept and not the nightmare we are all expecting to face. Jerry truly listens to our problems and concerns and customizes a product to our needs. He has put us “in control” of our business. You can’t go wrong when Jerry has your back”!
Shirley & Jack S., Owner, Apex Grading

Partnership or Limited Liability Company (LLC) Agreements 

You should be aware of and review your agreements with your attorney to ensure it addresses the significant changes to the partnership audit regime that will generally apply to partnership/LLC tax returns filed for the 2018 tax year and later years. These changes include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Replacement of a “tax matters partner” with a “partnership representative”,
  • Current partners being held responsible for tax liabilities of prior partners,
  • The partnership being held responsible for remittance of additional tax rather than individual partners being taxed,
  • Numerous elections or opt-outs that the “partnership representative” may make.

3 Liability Planning Tips for Physicians

You probably know that the practice of medicine is a profession fraught with the risk of liability. It’s not just medical malpractice claims either (although those are certainly scary enough). It’s the entire scope of risk from being in business, including employment-related issues, careless business partners and employees, and contractual obligations, as well as personal liabilities. Unfortunately, in our litigious society, these liability risks are not unique to physicians, although physicians are a frequent target.

Below are three liability planning tips for physicians to protect their hard-earned money.

5 Frightening Things Thieves Can Do with Your Identity

Maybe you love shopping online. Or, maybe you prefer to use your debit card to make purchases in the store. No matter how you leave your digital footprint, you – and virtually everyone else who's not completely off the grid – are at risk of falling victim to identity theft. In fact, nearly 16.7 million American consumers have had their identities compromised, according to a 2018 identity fraud report. Maybe this does not come as a surprise, but have you really considered all the risks associated with identity theft?Sure, there are some telltale signs that your identity has been compromised. But, in an ever-changing digital landscape, it is important to note the unusual but frightening ways thieves can use a stolen identity for their own financial gain.

1. Open a New Credit Card Account

Instead of stealing your own credit card to make purchases, a thief may use your name and Social Security number to open random accounts. Because these fraudulent charges won't appear on your current bank statement, you may not notice right away. Only when your credit report takes a plunge will you notice that a criminal has accumulated debt in your name. The good news, however, is that getting rid of fraudulent credit accounts in your name is entirely possible.

9 Signs that Someone is Using Your Identity

After months of searching, you've finally found it: the elusive perfect apartment, and it's yours pending a routine credit check. You're practically planning your housewarming party when the landlord calls you to tell you your application has been rejected. You're crushed, but more importantly you're worried and upset. Could you be the victim of identity theft?Every year, millions of lives are financially hijacked by a stolen identity.

Estate Litigation to Rise in 2018, LeClairRyan Attorney Predicts

estate-litigation-cpa-adviceWILLIAMSBURG, Va., Feb. 13, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- As baby boomers continue to age, the pace of estate litigation is accelerating, according to Will Sleeth, a partner in national law firm LeClairRyan's Williamsburg office and leader of the firm's Estate and Trust Litigation team.

"Changes in the federal estate tax have grabbed many of the headlines, but I expect four other estate litigation trends will move to the forefront in 2018," says Sleeth, who highlights some likely developments in a blog, 4 Estate Litigation Predictions For 2018.

Estate Litigation Volume: "We are very likely to see an increase in the volume of estate litigation in 2018," writes Sleeth in the post that appears in the firm's Estate Conflicts blog, which focuses on disputes involving wills, trusts, guardianships, and celebrity estates. One reason is the aging of our society; and with more money being passed down, "there's much more to fight over than at any time in the past," he observes.

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