Jerry Jones CPA
Wouldn’t it be nice to have a CPA that you deal directly with, that understands your business, that works in all 50 states and is there for you when you need him?
“I am a small business owner operating an equipment distribution business in Fontana, CA. I feel fortunate to have known Jerry personally and professionally for over 22 years. Jerry was tempted to walk away when he first saw the mess I had created in growing my business, but he showed patience and persistence in getting our operation organized. Jerry has advised and assisted me with organizing our accounting system, business and personal planning, real estate acquisitions, major supplier negotiations, credit facilities and tax returns. His knowledge with the tax laws and requirements is quite reassuring. In short, I have known Jerry through good times and bad and he has proven to be a very valuable resource to the company and myself. If anyone has any questions, I would happy to talk to you and elaborate further”.
Will M., President, WRM, Inc.

3 Awful Reasons to Take Social Security Benefits at 62

Because Social Security eligibility kicks in at age 62, many seniors rush to claim benefits as early as possible. But there's a downside to filing at 62: reducing your benefits by taking them ahead of full retirement age (FRA).

For today's workers, FRA is either 66, 67, or 66 and a certain number of months -- it all depends on your year of birth. Either way, filing at 62 means taking benefits early and reducing them in the process.

What sort of reduction are we talking about? If you're looking at an FRA of 67, filing at 62 will slash your benefits by 30%. And unless you happen to undo your application in time, once you lock in that lower benefit, it'll remain in effect for the rest of your life.

Now there are certain circumstances under which claiming benefits at 62 makes sense. But these three reasons for filing early just don't.

How Much Do You Need to Earn to Max Out Your Social Security Benefit?

The maximum Social Security benefit for a new retiree in 2018 is north of $33,000 per year at full retirement age and can be even higher for workers who wait. So how much do you need to earn if you want the maximum Social Security benefit when you retire?

Unfortunately, this question is more complicated than it may seem. Here's a rundown of how much you can get from Social Security, how much you'll need to have earned to get the maximum benefit, and how the maximum benefit amount could change in the future.

Steps Victims Can Take to Minimize Effect of Data Theft

steps-to-protect-victims-tax-law-IRSEvery day, the theft of personal and financial information puts people at risk of identity theft. Generally, thieves try to use the stolen data as quickly as possible to:

  • Sell the information to other criminals.
  • Withdraw money from a bank account.
  • Make credit card purchases.
  • File a fraudulent tax return for a refund using victims' names.

Victims of a data loss should follow these steps to minimize the effect of the theft:

  • Try to determine what information the thieves compromised. Compromised information may include emails and passwords, or more sensitive data, such as name and Social Security number.

  • Take advantage of credit monitoring services when offered by the affected organization.

  • Place a freeze on credit accounts to prevent access to credit records. It varies by state, but there may be a fee to place a freeze on an account. At a minimum, victims should place a fraud alert on their credit accounts by contacting one of the three major credit bureaus. A fraud alert isn't as secure as a freeze, but it's free.

  • Reset passwords on online accounts, especially those of financial sites and email and social media accounts. Use different passwords for each account. Some experts recommend at least 10-digit passwords, mixing letters, numbers and special characters. Victims may also wish to consider using a password manager or app.

If / Then Scenarios for Taxpayers Who Get Phished

The IRS reminds taxpayers that the agency does not initiate contact with taxpayers by email or text messages to request personal or financial information. This includes requests for PIN numbers, passwords or similar information for credit cards, banks and other financial accounts.

This is important for everyone to remember because thieves often pose as the IRS to get taxpayers to turn over personal information in a scam called phishing. Phishing is typically carried out through unsolicited emails or websites.

30 Ways Your Tax Return Could Trigger an IRS Audit

audit-IRS-tax-advice-Jerry-Jones-cpaRED FLAGS

For most taxpayers, it's unlikely that they will be audited by the IRS. But that doesn't mean it's completely out of the question. While the number of audits dropped to its lowest point in 14 years last year, the IRS knows that every $1 spent on audits brings in $4 to the Treasury Department. We spoke to several tax experts and found out just what the IRS is looking for when it's considering an audit and how you can trigger an audit through mistakes, oversights, and not-so-brilliant deductions.

DEVIATE FROM THE NORM

The IRS freely admits that it needs only a single anomaly to audit a return. Sometimes, audits are based solely on a statistical formula that your return had the misfortune of deviating from. The IRS develops those "norms" from audits of a statistically valid random sample of returns, as part of the National Research Program the IRS conducts. Basically, even some minor, unexplained glitch in your return can trigger an audit.

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