Jerry Jones CPA
Wouldn’t it be nice to have a CPA that you deal directly with, that understands your business, that works in all 50 states and is there for you when you need him?
"We highly recommend Jerry Jones, a CPA in Reno, NV to anyone who is interested in being advised in all areas of their tax planning in an efficient and expert manner. He is a very dedicated individual who works hard for his clients, handling all of his clients personally, and follows through on every part of the tax-filing process. Jerry is extremely knowledgeable with the regulations and requirements needed to successfully calculate both personal and business taxes, and is vigilant in keeping up with the latest laws, updates, and changes. Jerry is a creative thinker who has always made himself available outside of normal business hours to answer our questions. We particularly appreciate the occasional emails he sends out apprising his clients of changes to the tax code that could affect us. If you are looking for an engaged, and thoroughly competent CPA, look no further."
Chris & Amanda Schroeder, Reno, NV

14 Nice-Try Tax Breaks Rejected by the IRS

Over the years, taxpayers have concocted a lot of zany arguments to justify their tax breaks. We’ve come up with 14 of the most creative ones that the courts decided did not quite work.

A Little Peace and Quiet

A busy tax preparer ran her business from her home. During tax season, she felt so harassed from clients calling her at all hours of the day and night that she occasionally booked a room at a local hotel for some peace and quiet. On her own return, she deducted the cost of this rest and relaxation as a business expense. Unfortunately for her, the Tax Court ruled that the cost of her good night’s sleep was a nondeductible personal expense.

Investigating Daddy’s Mysterious Death

A CPA paid millions of dollars to private investigators and other experts to help him find out whether his father, who died when the taxpayer was a child, was murdered or committed suicide. He deducted the payments on Schedule C as business expenses. He believed that if he gathered enough evidence, the story could become a book or even a movie. The Tax Court categorized his activity as a hobby and nixed the write-off.

My Little Princess

A couple’s daughter began competing in beauty pageants at age 9. She won between $1,000 and $2,000 in prize money each year that was deposited into her college savings account. The parents reported the income on their returns and also took large write-offs for the cost of travel, costumes and other expenses.

Because the prize winnings were compensation for the child’s services in the pageant, they are included in her income. And only she can deduct the costs, even though the expenditures were made by the parents. So the Tax Court denied the parents’ deductions.

Tool on IRS.gov helps taxpayers research charities before making donations

When people are done giving thanks at the dinner table, many start another kind of giving.

 

Taxpayers may be able to deduct donations to tax-exempt organizations on their tax return. As people are deciding where to make their donations, the IRS has a tool that may help. Tax Exempt Organization Search on IRS.gov is a tool that allows users to search for charities. It provides information about an organization’s federal tax status and filings.

Here are four facts about the Tax Exempt Organization Search tool:

  • Donors can use it to confirm an organization is tax exempt and eligible to receive tax-deductible charitable contributions.
  • Users can find out if an organization had its tax-exempt status revoked. A common reason for revocation is when an organization does not file its Form 990-series return for three consecutive years.
  • EO Select Check does not list certain organizations that may be eligible to receive tax-deductible donations, including churches, organizations in a group ruling, and governmental entities.
  • Organizations are listed under the legal name or a “doing business as” name on file with the IRS. No separate listing of common or popular names is searchable.

New IRS publication helps taxpayers Get Ready for tax reform

The IRS issued a new publication to help taxpayers learn about tax reform and how it affects their taxes. Taxpayers can access Publication 5307, Tax Reform Basics for Individuals and Families, on IRS.gov/getready.

Get Ready for Taxes:

Get 2018 tax documents ready for upcoming filing season

The IRS reminds taxpayers to keep a copy of their past tax returns and supporting documents for at least three years. Certain key information from their prior year return may be required to file in 2019.

The IRS has recently updated its Get Ready page with steps to take now for the 2019 tax filing season.

Keeping copies of prior year tax returns saves time. Often previous tax information is needed to file a current year tax return or to answer questions from the Internal Revenue Service. Taxpayers claiming certain securities or debt losses should keep their tax returns and documents for at least seven years.

IRS Resources Can Help Small Businesses Better Understand How Tax Reform Affects Their Bottom Line

Small business owners can visit IRS.gov for a wide range of resources that will help them better understand tax reform. Last year’s Tax Cuts and Jobs Act includes tax law changes that may affect small businesses’ bottom line.

Here are some resources available to help small business owners:

Tax Reform section of IRS.gov
This section of IRS.gov includes links to resources that will help businesses understand exactly how the law affects their bottom line.

Tax Reform Guidance
Includes links to resources with specific technical information about the law and how it applies to businesses. These resources include, regulations, revenue procedures, revenue rulings and notices.

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